10 Cities Near Las Vegas To Live in 2021

Las Vegas is easily one of the most popular places in the world for travelers. And for some, it’s where they want to live.

But living right in the heart of a tourist-filled city that’s always awake is not the vibe everyone is looking for. Rather than be around the city crowds 24/7, you can live near the hustle and bustle of Las Vegas without being directly in it.

Here are 10 cities near Las Vegas where you should live. All are within about 60 miles of downtown, which means you’ll be in the center of the action in less than an hour of driving.

  • North Las Vegas
  • Paradise
  • Sunrise Manor
  • Spring Valley
  • Summerlin
  • Henderson
  • Enterprise
  • Boulder City
  • Moapa Valley
  • Pahrump

North Las Vegas

North Las Vegas, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 3.3 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,187 (up 33.73 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,287 (up 26.87 percent since last year)

North Las Vegas is just about as close to the action as you can get without being in the middle of it all the time. It’s a conveniently located city — you can quickly hop on the freeway and zip to other cities and Las Vegas areas in no time.

The city is evolving and expanding, meaning new businesses are moving in and updates are happening to common areas and neighborhoods.

It’s safer and a little quieter than the nearby areas, but you can still get to the Strip in less than 10 minutes.

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Paradise

paradise nv, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 5.9 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Paradise is perhaps the most lively place to live. It encompasses both the Strip, with incredible nightlife, entertainment and shops, as well as the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where a younger crowd is concentrated.

With that, it’s no surprise that there’s always something to do or see, whether you’re in the mood for a five-star meal, live performance or high-end shopping.

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Sunrise Manor

Sunrise Manor, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 6.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Just east of Las Vegas, near the base of Sunrise Mountain, are the suburbs of Sunrise Manor. While there aren’t as many restaurants and opportunities to shop, there are many parks and outdoor activities since you’re so close to the mountains.

It’s mainly a residential area and there are many people living there, but because it’s a quieter area, it doesn’t feel crowded. You get a great sense of community without feeling overwhelmed by the hustle and bustle of a bigger city.

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Spring Valley

Spring Valley, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 10.2 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Spring Valley is the perfect combination of being close to the city, while still being somewhat far away — but not too far away. It’s not so far out that you feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere, but the suburban environment doesn’t feel like a busy, constantly running city.

While there isn’t much by way of shopping or restaurants in Spring Valley, you’ve still got the Strip nearby, so you can easily have your pick of big-city amenities, or Summerlin, where you can enjoy a quieter boutique experience in an affluent area.

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Summerlin

Summerlin, NV.

Photo source: facebook.com/summerlinlv
  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 10.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Only 15 minutes from downtown, Summerlin is an affluent city that’s on the outer Eastern limit of Las Vegas. Here, it’s nothing but quiet living in the suburbs.

Although it isn’t a large, bustling city, Summerlin does have lots of shopping spots and unique restaurants, many of which are boutique clothing stores and one-of-a-kind, independent cafes.

Although it’s not the most affordable place to live, it’s one of the safest in the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

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Henderson

Henderson, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 14.1 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: $1,370 (down 2.65 percent since last year)
  • Two-bedroom average rent: $1,501 (down 5.01 percent since last year)

Henderson feels like it’s very much part of the greater Las Vegas area and is only about 20 minutes away from downtown. It’s a fairly safe area and has more of a suburban vibe, rather than that of a constantly busy city.

There’s easy access to shopping and dining. And, of course, there’s no shortage of entertainment nearby. Plus, residents in the area can get residential discounts on many Las Vegas shows and events.

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Enterprise

Enterprise, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 15.4 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Although Enterprise is only 20 minutes away from the bright lights of Las Vegas, it feels like you’re in a completely different world. It’s like a desert oasis and gives residents a more calm, slow-paced way of life.

It’s near lots of outdoor recreation, such as hikes and biking trails that take you up into beautiful desert mountains.

And even though you aren’t actually in the big city, you can still catch a glimpse of the Las Vegas lights from the higher vantage points of Enterprise. It’s really the perfect mix of desert living with city perks.

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Boulder City

Boulder City, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 26.7 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Located between Las Vegas and Hoover Dam, Boulder City is small, but it’s got just about everything you need to enjoy life without having to leave town. But if you decide you want to get away, downtown Las Vegas is only 30 minutes away.

Some of the more unique attractions that you won’t quite find in the big city are golf courses with unobstructed views and a flight line to the top of Red Mountain, where you can get an aerial view of the desert landscape.

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Moapa Valley

Moapa Valley, NV.

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 60.6 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

A tight-knit town that’s full of families with young children, Moapa Valley is a surprisingly fun place to live. You may not think that a town in the Nevada desert would be so lively, but the residents here have created a community that evolves around family entertainment.

It’s one of those places that everyone knows everyone and should you need help, all you need to do is ask and you’ll find plenty of people jumping at the opportunity. And because it’s such a family-centered community, it’s extremely safe and everyone looks out for each other.

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Pahrump

Pahrump, NV, one of the best cities near las vegas

  • Distance from downtown Las Vegas: 63.5 miles
  • One-bedroom average rent: N/A
  • Two-bedroom average rent: N/A

Pahrump was originally settled by ranchers and still carries a small-town western vibe in some parts. That being said, it’s a fully-functioning city with everything you need to live.

It’s the perfect location for anyone that wants to live near both Las Vegas and Los Angeles, as it’s right on the border of Nevada, near California.

One of its most popular events each year is its film festival, attracting locals and big-city dwellers alike that want to showcase their films, or that simply want to watch and enjoy their fellow neighbors’ artistic work.

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Make one of these cities near Las Vegas your next home

You’ve got the choice between big-city amenities, small-town living, the suburbs and everything in between — you only need to decide what you want! Then start looking for apartments near Las Vegas or houses to buy so you can start planning your move.

Rent prices are based on a rolling weighted average from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory of one-bedroom apartments in April 2021. Our team uses a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.
The rent information included in this article is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

The post 10 Cities Near Las Vegas To Live in 2021 appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Banquette, Baby!

I’ve been chugging along on the Hood Canal Cottage design – I know I am SO overdue for an update for you, but when you’re in the throes of design deadlines it can be really hard to find a moment to pause and recap everything. But I swear, it’s coming slowly. In recent weeks I’ve moved on from major architectural design and finish decisions into the interior design side of things. It’s been a tad overwhelming, as I haven’t decorated a space from scratch since we moved to San Francisco nearly 10 years ago (did you ever catch the tour of my first place in SF? I’m almost embarrassed to share it, but I was SO proud of it at the time).

Designing the Hood Canal Cottage is a unique situation to be in for a hobby designer like me. Usually, you move and take pieces with you, but since the cottage won’t serve as a full-time residence, I’m starting from a literal blank slate.

My focus this week has been on the dining room – or in this case dining space as the dining area sits within a great room that also houses the kitchen and living room. I’ve been shopping around like a madwoman trying to hone in on the look and feel I want to bring to life in the dining area. I want it to feel distinct and anchored – its own little zone within the larger room. And the idea I keep coming back to again and again is banquette seating.

Banquettes and built-ins have been having a moment for a while now, but I would argue for very good reason. A built-in banquette is a great space saver in a smaller space and increases the capacity around a dining table. Since I envision the Hood Canal Cottage as our hub for future Thanksgiving dinners and holiday gatherings, I definitely want to be able to cram as many people around the table as possible.

Like many of the examples you see here in this post, our dining table will also run parallel to a long wall, rather than float in the middle of the room. This actually limits the ability to pull back a dining chair. I would probably have to use a bench on that side of the table, but a banquette will allow the table to sit a little closer to the wall and not have legs you have to work around, saving precious floor space.

I also love how a banquette offers the opportunity to add big long seat cushions, back pillows, or both! Adding cushy upholstery to a dining space softens areas often dominated by hard surfaces. I love how that brings a sense of coziness, inviting you to sit and linger over your morning coffee, or pour that last little bit of wine and stay up talking. I want this home to encourage anyone who stays there to slow down and enjoy the little moments. Kinda like you’re living on vacation. That is the goal.

Adding a major upholstered piece at the dining table will also help me bridge the living room space and kitchen.

While I am obviously leaning toward jumping on the banquette bandwagon, I do have some convincing to do. Not everyone in my household is into the idea of a banquette. To add to that resistance, I’m not finding any good off-the-shelf options so it’s likely I’d have to go custom to create my vision. Custom is certainly not the most affordable of options.

So what say you? Do you happen to have a banquette in your home?? Do you like it? Have you found it comfy? Useful? Are there downsides you’ve dealt with? I think I’m pretty committed to this design choice at this point, but I would love to hear what you think! Please share in the comments section.

Catch up on the Hood Canal Cottage HERE.

Check out more design ideas HERE.

 

images vincent van duysen | home designing | mr & mrs white | danthree | amber interiors shoppe / larritt-evans design | poppy talk | nicole franzen | decus interiors / 

The post Banquette, Baby! appeared first on Apartment34.

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Source: apartment34.com

Dear Penny: My Sister Moved in With Dad, Says She Can’t Be Evicted

Dear Penny,

I am a 30-year-old who has built a stable and happy life after growing up in a family that was often unstable emotionally and financially. I love them, but as I become more successful, my family needs more and more of my support. 

My sister and her son moved into my father’s one-bedroom apartment in July, which is against the lease. I was very against this living situation because it’s way too small for two adults and a rambunctious child. My sister said she had no other options because she has terrible credit, little savings and an eviction. She was laid off for not having child care and is collecting unemployment. My father was struggling to pay for his apartment, as well. 

Their relationship has deteriorated. I don’t think they can continue living together. My aunt  co-signed for my father’s apartment and says my father can stay in her spare bedroom if he works with her to fix his finances. My aunt has been trying to help me, as she knows I am overwhelmed mediating their arguments and finances.

I told my sister we will need to find another place for her to live after April, and that I would co-sign if she sat down with me to go over her finances. She cried and said it would be impossible to find a place being unemployed, and that no one cares about her ending up homeless. 

She said she will refuse to leave the apartment if management doesn’t let her take over the lease. She believes that since she is a single mother with a child, they won’t be able to evict her. I’ve explained there could be negative consequences on her tenant record and for my aunt since she’s the co-signer,  but my sister says everything will be fine. 

I don’t want to hold my sister’s past mistakes against her, and COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted single mothers. She has been better with her money the last three months, but she has been very irresponsible in the past. (Example: paying for breast implants.) She can’t stay with me because I’m a head of house in my alma mater’s dorm, which grants me and my partner a free apartment. 

How should I proceed with my sister? Am I being too supportive, or not supportive enough? I feel guilty even having my own financial goals when my family is struggling. 

Sister Struggles

Dear Sister,

When someone tells you they’re about to behave terribly, listen. I don’t care if your sister has been more responsible for three months. She obviously doesn’t plan to be responsible moving forward. She’s also made it clear that she’s up for a fight. Please don’t co-sign for her and let her take down your credit in the process.

This is a problem between your sister, your dad and your aunt. I certainly feel for your aunt. I get that you’re both trying to help each other work through this mess. But you’re both ascribing magical thinking to your fix-it powers for your dad’s and sister’s financial messes. Nothing in your letter suggests that either one is interested in help.

If I were your aunt, I’d talk to an attorney who specializes in tenant law ASAP. You can suggest she do so. You also need to tell your sister you’re no longer in a position to co-sign. She’s going to cry and scream about how you’re ruining her life. Tell her by phone so you can hang up if things get out of hand.

The beauty here is that your living situation legitimately gives you a reason your sister and nephew can’t move in. I’d urge you to hang onto this arrangement as long as you can so you can develop firm boundaries. It’s OK to use dorm rules as an excuse while you get comfortable making it clear that you’re done bailing out your family.

Your signature probably isn’t the only thing standing between your sister and homelessness. Maybe she’s eligible for public housing, or she has friends who will let her couch surf. I’m not going to waste any energy exploring these options, though, because this is not your problem.

But here’s the trade-off: You don’t get to have an opinion even if you’re “very against” whatever living situation your sister comes up with. The second you weigh in, you’re throwing your sister a lasso. Don’t allow her to drag you back in.

This may seem like a money problem, but deep down it isn’t. Yes, life would be easier if you could buy your dad and your sister separate homes on opposite sides of town. But I suspect they’d still leave you emotionally drained. Emotional vampires always do.

Your financial goals are completely unrelated to your family’s struggles. The sooner you can separate the two, the better off you’ll be. Please don’t feel guilty for using your money to make good decisions for yourself instead of enabling your family’s bad ones.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. Send your tricky money questions to AskPenny@thepennyhoarder.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

FHA vs. Conventional Loans: Which Is Better?

When it comes to affording a new home, you have a few types of home loans to choose from. Prospective homebuyers often compare the FHA vs. the conventional loan when researching loans. Each loan type has certain stereotypes associated with them, but we are here to give you the facts about both FHA and conventional loans. This post will help you understand what each loan is, familiarize you with the differences between them, and provide some guidelines for how to pick which one is best for you.

What Is An FHA Loan?

An FHA loan is insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). These loans are issued by private lenders, but lenders are protected from losses by the FHA if the homeowner fails to repay. FHA loans are generally used to refinance or buy a home.

What Is A Conventional Loan?

A conventional loan is supplied by a private lender and isn’t federally insured. Requirements for obtaining a conventional loan vary depending on the lender. When used to buy property, conventional loans are typically known as mortgages.

What Is A Conventional Loan?

Differences Between FHA and Conventional Loans

The main difference between FHA and conventional loans is whether or not they are insured by the federal government. Conventional loans aren’t federally backed, so it’s riskier for the lender to loan money. On the other hand, FHA loans are protected by the government, and as a result of less risk, they can typically offer better deals.

This difference in federal insurance is the reason why FHA and conventional loans vary when it comes to the details of the loan. Keep reading to learn the differences regarding credit requirements, minimum down payments, debt-to-income ratios, loan limits, mortgage insurance, and closing costs.

FHA Loan Conventional Loan
Minimum Credit Score 500 620
Minimum Down Payment 3.5% 3%
Maximum Debt-to-Income Ratio Credit score of 500: 43%
Credit score of 580+: 43-50%
Credit score of 620: 33-36%
Credit score of 740+: 36-45%
Loan Limits Low-cost counties: $356,362
High-cost counties: $822,375
Contiguous US: $548,250
High-cost counties, AK, HI, and US territories: $822,375
Mortgage Insurance Mortgage insurance premiums required. Private mortgage insurance required with down payments less than 20%.
Property Standards Stricter standards, property purchased must be a primary residence. Flexible standards, property purchased doesn’t have to be a primary residence.

Sources: FHA Single Family Housing Policy Handbook | Fannie Mae 1 2 | Federal Housing Finance Agency | Freddie Mac | HUD 1 2 | Consumer Financial Protection Bureau 1 2

Credit Score

Your credit score is a determining factor in your loan eligibility. Your credit score is measured on a scale of 300 (poor credit) to 850 (excellent credit). Good credit helps you get approved for loans more easily and at better rates. FHA and conventional loans differ in their credit score requirements and represent financial options for individuals at either end of the credit spectrum.

Minimum Credit Score for FHA Loan: 500

  • Accepts a credit score as low as 500, but usually with a 10% down payment
  • These loans accept lower credit scores because they are insured
  • Note: Some lenders may only issue FHA loans with higher credit scores

Minimum Credit Score for Conventional Loan: 620

  • Accepted score may vary from lender to lender
  • These loans are usually offered to individuals with strong credit because they present less risk to lenders

Minimum Down Payment

A down payment is the sum of money that is paid as a percentage of your purchase up-front.

Minimum Down Payment on an FHA loan:

  • 10% of your purchase with 500 credit score
  • 3.5% of your purchase with 580+ credit score

Minimum Down Payment on a Conventional Loan:

  • 3% of your purchase can be put down with good credit
  • 5% to 20% of your purchase price is typical

Debt-to-Income Ratio

Your debt-to-income ratio is the amount of money paid toward debt each month divided by your total monthly income. To be eligible for a loan, you must be at or below the maximum debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.

Maximum DTI Ratio Guidelines for FHA loans:

  • 43% with a credit score of 500
  • 43–50% with a credit score of 580

Maximum DTI Ratio Guidelines For Conventional Loans:

  • 33-36% with a credit score lower than 740
  • 36-45% with a credit score of 740 or higher
  • 50% highest allowed through Fannie Mae

Loan Limits

Both FHA and conventional loans have limits on the amount that you can borrow. Loan limits vary based on your location and the year your loan is borrowed. Find 2021 loan limits specific to your county through the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

2021 FHA Loan Limits

  • High-cost counties: $822,375
  • Low-cost counties: $356,362

2021 Conventional Loan Limits

  • Contiguous US (excluding high-cost counties): $548,250
  • Alaska, Hawaii, US territories, and high-cost counties: $822,375

Mortgage Insurance

Mortgage insurance is taken out to protect the lender from losses in case you fail to repay your loan. Whether you will pay private mortgage insurance or mortgage insurance premiums is based on your loan type and down payment percentage.

FHA Loan

  • Mortgage insurance is required for all FHA loans.
  • It is paid to the FHA in the form of mortgage insurance premiums and includes an up-front and monthly premium.
  • MIP payments last the entire life of your FHA loan.
  • To get rid of MIPs after paying 20% of your loan, you can choose to refinance into a conventional loan.

Conventional Loan

  • Private mortgage insurance (PMI) is only required when a down payment below 20% is made.
  • PMI comes in different forms: monthly premium, up-front premium, and split premiums.
  • PMI requirements stop once you have met one of three requirements:
    1. Principal loan amount is reduced to 80% before the loan term ends.
    2. At least 78% of the principal balance is scheduled to be paid down.
    3. The halfway point of your loan term has passed.

Property Standards

There are different property standards that must be met to use each loan. FHA loans have stricter requirements, while conventional loans have more flexibility.

FHA Loan

  • Property purchased with FHA loans must be your principal residence, meaning the borrower has to occupy the residence
  • FHA loans can’t be used to invest in property (e.g., renting out or flipping)
  • Title must be in the borrower’s name or name of a living trust

Conventional Loan

  • Property purchased with a conventional loan doesn’t have to be a principal residence — second or third residences are allowed
  • Conventional loans can be used to purchase investment properties

Pros and Cons of FHA vs. Conventional Loans

As a result of the various differences between FHA and conventional loans, each type has its respective pros and cons.

FHA Loan

Conventional Loan

Pros

  • Qualify with low credit and high DTI
  • Smaller down payments overall
  • More affordable with low credit
  • Lowest option for down payments with good credit
  • PMI cancellable
  • More affordable with good credit
  • Property doesn’t have to be your main home

Cons

  • Mortgage insurance premiums required for life of loan
  • Property purchased must be your main home
  • Need higher credit and lower DTI to qualify
  • Typically has larger down payments
  • PMI required with a down payment less than 20%

Pros and Cons of FHA Loans

FHA loans are government-regulated and insured to extend flexible opportunities for homeownership. They’re flexible regarding credit and DTI, but stricter about insurance and property standards.

Pros

  • Flexible qualification with low credit and high DTI
  • Smaller down payments overall
  • More affordable with low credit

Cons

  • Mortgage insurance premiums required for life of loan
  • Property purchased must be your primary residence

Pros and Cons of Conventional Loans

Conventional loans can also offer flexibility, but generally only if you have good credit and demonstrate reduced risk to the lender. These loans have stricter qualifications, but flexibility in other areas.

Pros

  • Lowest option for down payments (3% with good credit)
  • Private mortgage insurance can be canceled (must meet requirements)
  • More affordable with good credit
  • Property purchased doesn’t have to be a primary residence

Cons

  • Strict qualifications require higher credit and lower DTI
  • Larger down payments are typical
  • Private mortgage insurance required with a down payment less than 20%

Which Loan Is Better For You?

Both FHA and conventional loans have their advantages and disadvantages. Here are some general guidelines for when to use an FHA loan or a conventional loan.

When To Use an FHA Loan

  • You have a low credit score (500–619)
  • Your DTI ratio is on the higher side (between 45–50%)
  • You can only afford a small down payment
  • You plan to use the property as your primary residence

When To Use an FHA Loan

When To Use a Conventional Loan

  • Your credit score is fairly good (620 or above)
  • Your DTI ratio is on the lower side (33–36%)
  • You can afford a larger down payment
  • You want flexibility with insurance and repaying your loan

When To Use a Conventional Loan

It’s important to thoroughly research your options before choosing a loan. A key takeaway when comparing FHA vs. conventional loans is that FHA loans are federally insured and conventional loans aren’t. This distinction results in different qualification and payment requirements for each loan.

Use the information in this post to carefully compare the differences in accepted credit scores, minimum down payments, loan limits, maximum debt-to-income ratios, mortgage insurance and property standards. In doing so, choose the loan that works for your circumstances and helps you best afford the home of your dreams.

Sources: FHA Single Family Housing Policy Handbook | US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development | Federal Housing Finance Agency | Freddie Mac

The post FHA vs. Conventional Loans: Which Is Better? appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

5 Ways to Keep Winter Decor Bright

Traditionally, spring and summer corner the market on bold, bright colors, with fall and winter ushering in richer, more muted tones. However, this year’s popular colors, featured in Shutterfly’s Hottest Hues Guide, have a versatility that helps enhance decor year-round. Incorporate pops of modern color trends into everyday home accessories to warm up your house and your heart in the cool days ahead.

Fall Harvest, see larger

1. Set a Color-filled Table

’Tis the season for holiday dinners, and your dining room table is the perfect place to fill your room with color. Saturate your tablescape with chargers, plates, placemats and napkins in festive colors. Deep reds and burgundies are not only perfect for the holidays, but they add warmth to your tablescape throughout the winter season. But don’t limit yourself to the standard red and green—get creative with color palettes as you set your table, bringing in metallic and unexpected shades for a dose of fun!

2. Patch it Together

Invite color to visit by adding seasonally inspired throw pillows or a practical and colorful quilt to your couch or bed. Think outside of your regularly colored box, and experiment with contrast to create a cozy space without committing to a color scheme.

Room filled with daylight, see larger

3. Bring the Outdoors In

Flowers lend a festive touch as well as a hint of brightness to any area. A bold spray of pink orchids or peonies can add a pleasantly surprising shock of color to a sleek neutral winter space. Just because it’s winter doesn’t mean you’re stuck with poinsettias. Pale pink is enjoying a comeback in the design world as a romantic neutral with a range of versatility—and rose quartz just happens to be one of Pantone’s colors of the year for 2016. As interior redesign specialist Wendy Wrzos says, “In fall, it can be paired with a rich brown and cream. In winter, a touch of pale pink will add a cozy warmth to a room, or be an unexpected addition to the more saturated colors.” Pick your palette from a favorite bouquet for a touch of color you already love.

vibrant laundry room, see larger

4. Live a Little Large

Bring big color to a small space by painting your laundry room a bold color for brightness you can enjoy all year round. “The laundry room is a room that gets used all the time, and it is rare to see one that has been decorated. A painted wall and a colorful rug takes no effort at all, and will cheer it up in an instant.” —Wrzos advised. Use a small, out-of-the-way area to be brave with a shade that brings you joy when you see it.

Living room artwork, see larger

5. Hang It Up

The artwork in a room is often a focal point and the perfect place to feature color. With a foundation of neutral furniture, flooring, and walls, art and decor accessories can take center stage. Create a canvas or three-panel piece of art from a nature-inspired vacation photo and select a matching color palette to complement your art work. If you’re looking for a more seasonal do-it-yourself option, wrap poster frame inserts in pretty wrapping paper for a temporary triptych to match your holiday decorating scheme.

Between bad weather and Daylight Savings Time, winter feels dark enough. Fill your life with brightness all year round by incorporating color in easy, unexpected ways and bring a little more boldness and brilliance into your everyday world.

About the Author

Ashley McCann shares home décor tips for Shutterfly.com. She is a mom of two and enjoys reading and karaoke. For more from Ashley, you can find her on Twitter.

The post 5 Ways to Keep Winter Decor Bright first appeared on Century 21®.

Source: century21.com

HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)

With the growing use of paperless forms, electronic information transfers and storage has become the norm. This is true about our medical information as well. So, how do we know that our sensitive medical records are being kept private? Thanks to a federal law entitled Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), health plans, health care providers, and health care clearinghouses are required to abide by a set of standards to protect your data. While this law does offer protection for certain things, there are some companies that are not required to follow these standards. Keep reading to find out where the loopholes are and how you are being protected by this law. 

What is the HIPAA Law and Privacy Rule?

Although HIPAA and Privacy and Security Rules have been around since 1996, there have been many revisions and changes over the years so to keep up with evolving health information technology. HIPAA and the HIPAA Privacy Rule set the bar for standards that protect sensitive patient information by making the rules for electronic exchange as well as the privacy and confidentiality of medical records and information by health care providers, health care clearing houses, and health plans. In accordance with HIPPA, Administrative Simplification Rules were created to safeguard patient privacy. This allows for information that is medically necessary to be shared while also maintaining the patient’s privacy rights. The majority of professionals in the health care industry are required to be compliant with the HIPAA regulations and rules. 

Why do we have the HIPAA Act and Privacy Rule?

The original goal of HIPAA was to make it easier for patients to keep up with their health insurance coverage. This is ultimately why the Administrative Simplification Rules were created to simplify administrative procedures and keep costs at a decent rate. Because of all the exchanges of medical information between insurance companies and health care providers, the HIPAA Act aims to keep things simple when it comes to the healthcare industry’s handling of patient records and documents and places a high importance on maintain patients’ protected health information. 

HIPAA Titles

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, a federal law which was designed to safeguard healthcare data from data breaches, has five titles. Here is a description of each title:

  • Title I: HIPAA Health Insurance Reform: The objective of Title I is to help individuals maintain health insurance coverage in the event that they lose or change jobs. It also prevents group health plans from rejecting applicants from being covered for having specific chronic illnesses or pre-existing conditions. 
  • Title II: HIPAA Administrative Simplification: Title II holds the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) responsible for setting national standards for processing electronic healthcare transactions. In accordance with this title, healthcare organizations must implement data security for health data transactions and maintain HIPPA compliance with the rules set by HHS. 
  • Title III: HIPPA Tax-Related Health Provisions: This title is all about the national standards regarding tax-related provisions as well as the general rules and principles in relation to medical care.  
  • Title IV: Application and Enforcement of Group Health Plan Requirements: Title IV elaborates further on issues related to health insurance coverage and reform, one key point being for patients with pre-existing conditions. 
  • Title V: Revenue Offsets:  This title has provisions regarding company-owned life insurance policies as well as how to handle situations in which individuals lose their citizenship due to issues with income taxes. 

In day to day conversations, when you hear someone bring up HIPAA compliance, they are most likely referring to Title II. To become compliant with HIPAA Title II, the health care industry must follow these provisions:

  • National Provider Identifier Standard: Every healthcare entity is required to have a 10-digit national provider identifier number that is unique to them, otherwise known as, an NPI. 
  • Transactions and Code Sets Standard: Healthcare organizations are required to follow a set of standards pertaining to electronic data interchange (EDI) to be able to submit and process insurance claims.  
  • HIPAA Privacy Rule: This rule sets national standards that help to protect patient health information.
  • HIPAA Security Rule: This rule establishes the standards for patient data security. 

What information is protected by HIPAA?

The HIPAA Privacy Rule safeguards all individually identifiable health information obtained or transferred by a covered entity or business associate. Sometimes this information is stored or transmitted electronically, digitally, on paper or orally. Individually identifiable health information can also be referred to under the Privacy Rule as PHI. 

Examples of PHI are:

  • Personal identifying information such as the name, address, birth date and Social Security number of the patient. 
  • The mental or physical health condition of a person.
  • Certain Information regarding the payment for treatments.

HIPAA penalties

Health industries and professionals should take extra caution to prevent HIPAA violations. If a data breach occurs or if there is a failure to give patients access to their PHI, it could result in a fine. 

There are several types of HIPAA violations and penalties including:

  • Accidental HIPAA violations could result in $100 for an isolated incident and an upward of $25,000 for repeat offenses.
  • Situations in which there is reasonable cause for the HIPAA violation could result in a $1,000 fine and an upward of $100,000 annually for repeat violations.
  • Willfully neglecting HIPAA can cost anywhere between $10,000-$50,000 and $250,000-$1.5 million depending on whether or not it was an isolated occurrence, If it was corrected within a specific timeframe. 

The largest penalty one could receive for a HIPAA violation is $50,000 per violation and $1.5 million per year for repeated offenses.

HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

How to Teach Your Teen to Budget Like a Pro

It amazes us how quickly our girls are growing up. Next month when school starts up again, we’ll have a fourth-grader and a kindergartener.

Even though we have some time before they are ready to move out of the house, we want to spend time now prepare them for the big transition. As a parent, you probably feel the same way too. 

One crucial piece of a financial foundation kids and in particular, teens, need to master is learning to budget (and sticking with it),

While they’re home now, you have a fantastic opportunity to get them comfortable with handling their money.

If you’re not sure where to start, here are some tips from fellow parents and experts in the personal finance space to make teaching this life skill a bit easier less stressful for you and your teen!

Teach Your Teen to Budget for Real Life

Teens or not, whenever most people hear the word budget, they also hear the word ‘no’. To them, budgets feel like a strict diet. Just as fad diets fail, an unrealistic or extreme budget will more than likely discourage your teen and they will quit.

The first step before you even talk about the numbers is to discuss exactly what a successful and sustainable budget should be. When done right, a budget is something that helps you move your money towards your goals. Explain to them that at its root, budget is simply a plan about what they’d like to do.

You want a budget that can cover:

  •     Essential bills
  •     Future goals
  •     Discretionary expenses

When your teen’s budget covers those goals, they’re not only putting their finances in a good spot, but they’re moving closer to their specific long term dreams.

Creating a Doable Budget (They’ll Actually Enjoy!)

Once your teen(s) understands how a budget works, it’s important for them to create a budget that they can use in the real world. You can honestly budget however you want, but an easy budget to get your teen started is the 50/20/30.

Quite simplify, the 50/20/30 budget puts money into those three main buckets:

  •     50%  goes towards essentials
  •     20% towards savings (or investing)
  •     30% for fun and discretionary expenses

I appreciate how easy and flexible this budget can be. You can adjust the percentages for your teen’s needs, but it gives them some ballpark idea of how to portion their finances when they are out on their own.

How do you start them out on this budget?

With teens, you may have expenses like clothing or their cellphone bill count as essentials, or you may want to give your child the experience of being responsible for a small, shared family bill while they are still at home.

For older teens, you could even charge them a nominal ‘rent’ to offset their portion of the bills. In some cases, parents give that money back to their child as a gift to help with moving expenses (like for their security deposit) or use as additional savings. 

However you decide, talk it over so your teen understands why you’re doing it this way.

Share Your Family Budget

Creating a budget isn’t complicated, but it can difficult if your teen has no idea what to expect. Knowledge can be empowering.

While we may take it for granted since have to deal with the numbers, but your teen may not be aware of how much it takes to keep the lights on and roof over their heads. If you haven’t already shared your own budget already, now is the time.

Not knowing also puts them at a disadvantage when they start searching for a place or are comparing prices on expenses. Being armed with the numbers makes your teenager a more informed consumer.

When Your Teen Breaks Their Budget

Will there be times where your teenager will mess up with their budget? Probably so. However, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. As parents, we tend to want to protect our kids, but we also have to prepare them for the real world. As Ron Lieber, author of The Opposite of Spoiled, pointed out we should let our kids make financial mistakes. 

Wouldn’t it be better for your child to break the clothing budget while they’re still at home allowing you to help guide them through rather than having break their monthly budget while they are on their own and have bills to pay?

Mistakes will happen, they’re a part of life so giving your teen time to work those them and adjust their budget is a blessing for their future selves.

Essential Accounts for Your Teen  to Have

Since we’re talking about budgets, we should also mention some essential accounts you’d want your kid to have so they can practice managing their money.

Opening up student checking and savings accounts (usually free low on fees as well as not having minimum balance requirements) are good foundational accounts for your teen. They can deal with real-world situations pending charges, automatic transfers, and direct deposits.

As Family Balance Sheet founder Kristia Ludwick pointed out, teens should have the skill of balancing a checkbook even if they decide to go all-digital with their banking.

If they work, talk it over together and see if they can open up an IRA and start contributing. It doesn’t have to be much. The idea is to get them familiar and comfortable with the basics of investing.

Even if they put in $25 a paycheck, having them practice setting aside money in their budget for both long and short term goals is an invaluable lesson. You can also encourage them to contribute by offering a match for what they put in.

How Teens Can Easily Stay on Top of Their Money

With several accounts to keep tabs on, your teen is going to need an easy system to track their budget and goals.

With Mint, they can link up their accounts in one secure spot. They can also add their budget along with any savings goals they want to hit and make sure they stick with them.

Hopefully, these ideas and tips will make it easier to help your teen transition into a self-sufficient adult.

The post How to Teach Your Teen to Budget Like a Pro appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

7 Myths About Work From Home Jobs & What It’s Really Like

I have been working from home or while traveling full-time since around 2013, and since then I have heard so many myths about work from home jobs.I have been working from home or while traveling full-time since around 2013, and since then I have heard so many myths about work from home jobs.

Some of the things that I’ve heard over the years include:

“Working from home must be boring.”

“You must have so much free time to get chores done!”

“Aren’t all work from home jobs scams?”

“Working from home isn’t a real job”

Whether you work for yourself and your office is in your home, or if you telecommute and work for someone else, I’m sure you’ve heard some of these myths about work from home jobs as well.

Truth is, so many people think that working from home is something different, until they get to experience it.

And, this is something that many people are learning in 2020 due to current events!

Now, I want to say that I absolutely love and enjoy working from home.

I would not change a single thing about working from home.

However, some people have said certain things to me that really make me laugh. I think part of that is because they’ve never worked from home before, and the reality is that working from home is still work.

Working from home can be different for everyone because we all have different jobs. Also, what your work from home situation is like makes a big difference too. 

Working from home with kids can make things more challenging. Some jobs keep you tied to your laptop, some require extreme concentration, some are more flexible, etc.

Still, it’s all work!

Today, I want to talk about some of the most common work from home facts and myths. I’m going to explain the misconceptions of working remotely and what’s really happening when people work from home.

Now, I hope today’s article doesn’t come across as a big complaint. Instead, I simply want to shed some light on the topic and explain the truth about working from home.

Content related to myths about work from home jobs:

  • 12 Work From Home Jobs That Can Earn You $1,000+ Each Month
  • Ways To Make An Extra $1,000 A Month
  • 9 Work From Home and Travel Careers
  • 15 Outdoor Jobs For People Who Love Being Outside

Here are common 7 myths about work from home jobs.

 

Myth: You can run errands for everyone during the day

“You must have so much free time to get chores done!”

When I first started working from home, I received so many phone calls from people asking me to do favors, and almost every single time it started with “since you have nothing else to do during the day…”

While I don’t mind helping others around me, I know I’m not alone – this is something that many, many people who work from home have an issue with.

It can be so hard saying no.

Many people think that if you work from home, you don’t actually do anything all day. This sometimes leads to friends and family members asking for favors from those who work from home.

I know friends who work from home who have been asked to babysit, pick things up from the store, grab dry cleaning, bring a pet to the groomer, and more. 

If you have the time and you want to, by all means say yes to every favor. It does feel good to help others.

But, don’t feel like you have to jump on every request just because you work from home.

 

Truth: People who work from home still have to stick to a schedule

One of the reasons people believe that last myth is because working from home is so flexible, and they’ve probably heard that before.

The truth is, while it’s flexible, many people who work from home still try and stick to a normal-ish schedule. 

That’s because if you have other people in your life that keep regular 9-5 hours or have kids in school, working during “normal” hours makes the most sense. It’s probably the only time you have to get any work accomplished. 

Be honest with the people around you and explain the situation. More importantly, be realistic with yourself. It feels nice to help other people out, but running errands all day for others can prevent you from completing work, force you to work late in the evening or weekends, and it can also cost you money.

It also helps to set some boundaries with those around you. Tell the people in your life if there are certain times they shouldn’t bother you, that you might not pick up the phone right away, etc.

Not everyone will understand, some people will get it, and some people probably aren’t sure what working from home means.

But, most people will happily respect your boundaries once you tell them what they are.

 

Myth: Working from home is boring

“I could never work from home, I would be too bored.”

I hear this all the time, ever since I first started working from home.

This is one of the myths about work from home jobs that people believe because they think they would miss working with other people. I understand that – I remember having lots of fun with some of the people I used to work with.

Many people believe this myth because it might sound boring to stay in your house all of the time. It can be, that’s not always the case.

 

Truth: Working from home can be both exciting and boring

Some people would probably think that blogging is boring whether they did it in an office or from home. That’s probably true for lots of jobs.

Your job can be exciting, boring, stressful, calm, easy, difficult, etc. And, it can feel like all of those things over the course of the day. 

Another thing is that while working from home might sound boring to some people, I look at what it allows me to do. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job, and I don’t find it boring, at all. 

But, I also love that working from home allows me to travel full time. I have gotten to visit so many amazing places. And, I can choose when I work.

Still, there are some days when I’d rather be doing something other than working, but that doesn’t make working from home boring.

If you’re struggling with this, think about what your situation allows you to do. Focus on the positives.

Some people love what they do, and others love what their job allows them to do.

 

Myth: All work from home jobs are scams

When I tell people what I do, they usually don’t believe it. Many people think that home businesses are scams.

While this myth has eased a little bit over the years, a LOT of people thought working from home was a scam just about a decade ago.

Things have changed a lot in the last several years!

According to Stanford, 42% of the U.S. labor force currently works from home full-time in 2020.

Not all work at home jobs are scams. I have a legitimate business! Just like anyone else who has a business, mine is a business as well.

There are many, many work from home jobs that exist and are legitimate.

 

Truth: There are work from home scams

Unfortunately, there are still some scams out there. 

There are scams that say a company will pay you $10 for every envelope you stuff. There are some scams where a person says they’ll send you a big check up front, but you have to forward part of that check back to the business.

Work from home scams do exist, but that’s not at all the case with the majority of them.

Please head to How To Spot Work From Home Job Scams And Avoid Them At All Costs to learn more.

 

Myth: It’s easy to separate work and life

When you work from home or have your own business, it can be very difficult to completely stop working.

Whenever we go on a trip, I almost always continue working the same amount that I do when I am at home. When you are a business owner, especially in the beginning, you want to bust your butt off to make your business successful. 

It can go the other way too. If you are working from home and see dirty dishes in the sink or unfolded laundry, you can easily get distracted from what you’re doing and stop working. 

It’s also easy to get distracted by personal emails, phone calls, social media, etc. 

This is something I still struggle with.

 

Truth: You can make a better work from home environment

One of the things that may help you separate work from the rest of your life is making sure you set boundaries and create a good physical and mental space to work.

I recommend setting work hours for yourself, making time for vacations, taking breaks throughout the workday, and so on.

Even though you are working from home and you probably don’t have anyone looking over your shoulder to see what you are doing all day long, I still recommend having clear work hours. This will help you manage your time, complete your work, and “leave” work for the day.

If you get distracted by what else is happening in your house, try to make some space that is only for working. You don’t need an office – it can be as simple as a clean dining room table. Or, do the dishes and fold the laundry before you start working.

 

Myth: You’re not actually working when you’re at home

Working from home is still working!

You still have a job and tasks still need to be completed.

This is one of the myths about work from home jobs that gets me the most.

For some reason, many people associate working from home with not doing any work at all. Boy, are they wrong!

I have even had people not believe me and then ask for a full schedule of what I do each day to prove myself.

If me and the millions of other people weren’t actually working when they were home, how would we be holding jobs and getting paid?

 

Truth: People successfully work from home every day

The reality is that the only real thing that changes when you work from home is that the location is different.

People run multi-million dollar businesses from their home. Some hold side hustles, freelance, run Etsy shops, dog sit in their home, work jobs in the corporate world, and much more.

Sure, there are distractions and you may find more time to spend on non-work tasks, but working from home is still working.

 

Myth: You will be lonely when working from home

I’m often asked if I get lonely working from home, and this is one of the most common myths about work from home jobs.

People think that when you work from home that you have absolutely no contact with anyone else. But when I worked in an office, I hardly ever had human contact, except during meetings. That honestly felt more lonely than working from home.

Now, I talk to people all day long. I talk with other bloggers, I answer emails from my readers, and I interact with people on social media. I probably talk with more people now than I did when I worked in an office.

 

Truth: It can be lonely to work from home, but there are ways to make it less lonely

If you do start feeling lonely when you work from home, I have a couple of suggestions to beat the lonely feeling.

You can start a Slack chat with those that you work with or hop on a video call. There are also meetups you can attend that relate to work or your hobbies. There are also lots of online groups, like Facebook groups or subreddits, where you can network with others in your field.

Working from home doesn’t have to feel lonely all of the time.

 

Myth: You will spend all of your time in pajamas

When I first started working from home, I spent a lot of time in my pajamas.

However, that’s not the case anymore.

Now that we live on a boat and have to walk the dogs regularly, I have to go outside often and I’d prefer if everyone around me didn’t have to see me in my pajamas all the time, haha.

 

Truth: It’s okay to work in your pajamas

Some people get completely dressed up for work every day, even though they work from home full-time. It helps get them in the mood for work, and I completely get that.

Some put on a nice top, but still wear athletic shorts or pajama pants.

You will have to find what works best for you.

But, if you want to work in your pajamas, do it. That’s one of the perks of working from home. Don’t let anyone make you feel bad about wearing pajamas if that’s what you want.

 

What are the pros and cons of working from home?

I am a big fan of working from home. You can probably tell that now, haha!

The reasons these myths about work from home jobs bother me is because I love what I do and I love helping other people realize that they can work from home too.

Being able to work from home is one of the best things I’ve been able to do. Some of the pros are:

  • It allows me to spend more time with my family
  • I can travel full-time
  • My schedule is flexible
  • I can make a great income from home, and more

Now, what are the negatives of working from home?

Some of the cons are:

  • It can be hard to separate your work and life
  • Some people may find it lonely
  • Some people in your life may struggle with the boundaries you set
  • It can be a big adjustment if you’ve never done it before

The reality is that there are pros and cons about any kind of job. The negatives don’t just apply to work from home jobs. It’s about finding what works for you.

 

Is working from home right for you?

After reading all of the above, you may be wondering how you can make working from home work for you.

Here are some of my tips:

  • Set working hours for yourself
  • Create a dedicated work area
  • Hire help if you need it
  • Cut out distractions
  • Socialize with others
  • Don’t run errands for others all day long
  • Take time off work when you are sick

I recommend reading My Best Working From Home Tips So You Can Succeed to learn more about how you can work from home most efficiently.

Even with talking about all of the myths above, there are still many benefits to working from home.

Being able to work from home is one of the best things I’ve been able to do, and I know many people who feel the same way.  I know it can be hard at times, but it’s all just the reality of working from home.

What common myths about work from home jobs have you heard?

The post 7 Myths About Work From Home Jobs & What It’s Really Like appeared first on Making Sense Of Cents.

Source: makingsenseofcents.com

What Is a Nuncupative Will?

Elderly woman near deathMaking a last will and testament is an important part of your estate plan and there are different types of wills to choose from. A nuncupative will, meaning a will that’s oral rather than written, may be an option in certain circumstances. While state will laws typically require that a will be written, signed and witnessed to be considered legal, there are scenarios in which an oral will could be upheld as valid. Understanding how a nuncupative will works, as well as the pros and cons, can help with shaping your will-making plans if you have yet to create one.

A financial professional can offer advice on investing, retirement planning, financial planning and various other areas of finance. Find a financial advisor today. 

Nuncupative Will, Defined

A nuncupative will simply means a will that isn’t written. Instead, it’s delivered verbally by the person who intends to make the will.

Nuncupative wills are sometimes called deathbed wills since they’re often created in end-of-life situations where a person is too ill or injured to physically draft a will. The person making the will, known as a testator, expresses wishes about the distribution of property and other assets to witnesses.

How Does an Oral Will Work?

Ordinarily, when creating a will you’d draft a written document identifying yourself as the will maker and spelling out how you want your assets to be distributed after you pass away. You could also use a will to name legal guardians for minor children if necessary and name an executor for your estate.

An oral will sidesteps all that and simply involves the person making the will expressing his or her wishes verbally to witnesses. There would be no written document unless one of the witnesses or someone else who is present chooses to copy down what’s being said. The person making the will would have nothing to sign and neither would the witnesses.

There’s a reason oral wills are no longer used in most states: Without a written document that’s been signed by the person making the will and properly witnessed, it can be very difficult to prove the will maker’s intentions about how assets should be distributed or who should be beneficiaries.

Are Nuncupative Wills Valid?

Elderly man near death

This type of will is no longer considered valid in most states. Instead, you’ll need to draft a written will that follows your state’s will-making guidelines. For example, most states require that the person making a will be at least 18 and of sound mind. The will also has to be witnessed by the required number of people who don’t have a direct interest in the will’s contents. Depending on where you live, you may or may not need to have your will notarized.

There are a handful of states that still allow oral or verbal wills, however. But they’re only considered valid under certain circumstances.

In North Carolina, for example, oral wills are only recognized if:

  • The person making the will believes death is imminent
  • The witnesses are asked to testify to the will
  • Both witnesses are present with the testator when the will is dictated
  • The testator states that what he or she is saying is intended to be a will
  • An oral statement is made to at least two competent witnesses
  • The testator then passes away

Even if those conditions are met, the heirs to the will would still have to bring a legal action to have it admitted to probate court. The witnesses would have to testify to what was said and even then, North Carolina still doesn’t allow for the transfer of real estate through an oral will.

In New York, the guidelines are even narrower. New York State only allows nuncupative wills to be recognized as legal and valid when made by a member of the armed services during a time of war or armed conflict. The intentions of the person making the will has to be stated in front of two witnesses. State law automatically invalidates them one year after the person leaves military service if they don’t pass away at the time the will was made.

How to Prepare a Will

Having a written will in place can help your loved ones avoid problematic scenarios about how to divide your property after you pass away. If you don’t have a will in place yet, you risk dying intestate. There are a couple of ways you can create one.

The first is using an online will-making software. These programs can guide you through the will-making process and they’re designed to be easy enough for anyone to use, even if you’re not an attorney. If you have a fairly simple estate then using an online will-making software could help you create a will at a reasonable cost.

On the other hand, if you have a more complex estate then you may want to get help with making a will from an estate planning attorney. An attorney can help ensure that your will is valid and that you’re distributing assets the way you want to without running into any legal snags.

Generally, when making a will you should be prepared to:

  • Name an executor for your estate
  • Name a guardian for children if necessary
  • Specify who or which organizations you want to inherit your assets

When making a will, it’s important to remember that some assets can’t be included. For example, if you have any assets that already have a named beneficiary, such as a 401(k), individual retirement account or life insurance policy, those would go to the person you’ve named.

And it’s also important to note that a will is just one part of the estate planning puzzle. If you have a more complex estate then you may also need to consider setting up a living trust. A trust allows you to transfer assets to the control of a trustee, who manages them on behalf of the trust’s beneficiaries. Trusts can be useful for minimizing estate taxes and creating a legacy of giving or wealth if that’s part of your financial plan.

The Bottom Line

Dying person holds hands with a loved oneNuncupative wills are rare and while some states do recognize them, they generally aren’t valid in most circumstances. If you don’t have a will in place, then creating one is something you may want to add to your financial to-do list. Even if you don’t have a large estate or you’re unmarried with no children, having a will can still provide some reassurance about what will happen to your assets once you pass away.

Tips for Estate Planning

  • Consider talking to a financial advisor about will making and estate planning. If you don’t have a financial advisor yet, finding one doesn’t have to be complicated. SmartAsset’s financial advisor matching tool can help. By answering a few brief questions online you can get personalized recommendations for professional advisors in your local area. If you’re ready, get started now.
  • Along with a will and trust, there are other legal documents you might incorporate into your estate plan. An advance healthcare directive, for instance, can be used to spell out your wishes in case you become incapacitated. Power of attorney documents allow you to name someone who can make medical or financial decisions on your behalf when you’re unable to.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/FatCamera, ©iStock.com/Sean_Warren, ©iStock.com/LPETTET

The post What Is a Nuncupative Will? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com