Seven things college freshmen don’t need — and ten they do

This article originally appeared on NerdWalletThose ubiquitous checklists of “dorm room essentials” for college freshmen are filled with items that will be ditched by the end of first semester.

Some parents “go to the store and grab a list like they did when their kids were in elementary and high school and just go straight down the list,” says Lisa Heffernan, mother of three sons and a college-shopping veteran. Or they buy things they only wish their students will use (looking at you, cleaning products).

You can safely skip about 70% of things on those lists, estimates Asha Dornfest, the author of Parent Hacks and mother of a rising college sophomore who’s home for the summer.

What Not to Buy or Bring

Freshmen really need just two things, says Heffernan, co-founder of the blog Grown and Flown: a good mattress topper and a laptop.

Here are seven items you can skip:

  • Printer. Don’t waste desk space or, worse, store it under the bed; printers are plentiful on campus.
  • TV. Students may watch on laptops or on TVs in common areas or in someone else’s room. Bonus: Your teen gets out and meets others.
  • Speakers. Small spaces don’t require powerful speakers; earphones may be a good idea and respectful of roommates.
  • Car. Some colleges bar freshmen from having cars on campus or limit their parking. You also may save on insurance by keeping the car at home.
  • Luggage. If you bring it, you must store it. Heffernan suggests collapsible blue Ikea storage bags with zippers.
  • Toiletries to last until May. Bulk buying may save money, but you need storage space.
  • Duplicates of anything provided by the college, such as a lamp, wastebasket, desk chair or dresser.

Items left behind when students pack for the summer are telling. Luke Jones, director of housing and residence life at Boise State University, sees unopened food — a lot of ramen and candy — and stuffed animals and mirrors.

Jones says many students regret bringing high school T-shirts and memorabilia and some of their clothes (dorm closets typically are tiny).

What Can You Buy, Then?

Before you shop, find out what the college forbids (candles, space heaters, electric blankets and halogen lights are common). Have your student check with assigned roommates about appliances (who’s bringing a fridge or microwave?) and color scheme if they want to set one. Know the dimensions of the room and the size of the bed. And most of all, know your budget. Not everything has to be brand new.

Ten things — besides the all-important mattress topper and laptop — that many students consider dorm room essentials include:

  • One or two fitted sheets in the correct bed size, plus pillowcases. Heffernan says most students don’t use top sheets.
  • Comforter or duvet with washable cover.
  • Towels in a distinctive pattern or light enough for labeling with laundry marker, plus shower sandals.
  • Power cord with surge protector and USB ports.
  • Basic first aid kit.
  • Easy-to-use storage. If it’s a lot of work to get something out, your student won’t, Heffernan says.
  • Cleaning wipes. Students might not touch products that require multiple steps, but they might use wipes, according to Heffernan.
  • Reading pillow with back support for studying in bed.
  • Area rug. Floors are often hard and cold.
  • Comfort items. Dornfest says it could be a blanket or a picture of the dog — something from home that will make the space a bit more personal.

Afraid you’ll forget something important? You might, Heffernan says. But chances are, you or your student can order it online and get it delivered. Consider doing this with some items simply to avoid the hassle of bringing them yourself, and remember that “dorm necessities” often go on sale once school starts.

Do a Reality Check

If you or your student still want to replicate the rooms you’ve seen on Instagram and Pinterest, think about how the room will actually be used.

Once your son or daughter moves in, the room will never look like that again. Opt for sturdy items and be realistic. Will throw pillows make the place look more homey and inviting, or will they be tossed on the floor until parents’ weekend?

Dornfest, a co-host of the Edit Your Life podcast, offers a compelling reason not to make things too comfortable. “A freshman needs to be encouraged to get out of the dorm room,” she says. “Anything that pulls you into campus life can be good.”

She’s not advocating a monk-like environment, but rather one that encourages breaking out of routines. College should be a time to try new things and meet people from different backgrounds. Dornfest advises making the bed as comfortable as possible and keeping a few reminders of home. The ideal dorm room is more launch pad than cocoon.

More from Nerdwallet

  • Budgeting for College Students
  • How to Build Credit at 18
  • How to Choose a Student Credit Card

The article 7 Things College Freshmen Don’t Need — and 10 They Do originally appeared on NerdWallet.

Source: getrichslowly.org

Does Paying Off a Loan Early Hurt Your Credit Score?

A woman in a red shirt sits in front of her laptop with her head in her hands.

Paying off debt to build credit is a pretty well-known strategy. It can help improve your credit score, especially if you’re carrying a large balance on your credit cards. So if you have other types of debt, like car or home loans, paying off those accounts might seem like a step in the right direction.

But here’s the thing—having a mix of accounts in your credit history is goodfor your credit score. You’ll actually want to have a good mix of revolving and installment loans. So does paying off a loan early hurt credit?

Does Your Credit Score Drop When You Pay Off Debt?

Unfortunately, paying off non-credit card debt early might make you less credit-worthy according to scoring models. When it comes to credit scores, there’s a big difference between revolving accounts (such as credit cards) and installment loan accounts (such as a mortgage or student loan).

Paying an installment loan off early won’t improve your credit score. It won’t necessarily lower your score, either. But keeping an installment loan open for the life of the loan could help maintain your credit score.

Credit Cards vs. Installment Loans

Credit cards are revolving accounts, which means you can revolve a balance from month to month as part of the terms of the agreement. Even if you pay off the balance, the account stays open. A credit card with a zero balance—or a very low balance—and a high credit limit is good for your credit score because it helps lead to a low credit utilization rate.

Installment loan accounts affect your credit score differently. An installment loan has a set number of scheduled payments spread over a predetermined period of time. When you pay off an installment loan, you’ve essentially fulfilled your part of the loan obligation. The balance is brought to $0, and the account is closed.

Does Paying Off a Loan Build Credit?

Paying off an installment loan as agreed over time does build credit. In part, that’s because 35% of your credit score is based on timely payments. And if you make timely payments for five or more years on an installment loan, that’s a lot of goodwill for your credit score.

Types of Credit and Length of Credit History

Credit scores are typically better when a consumer has had different types of credit accounts. It shows that you’re able to manage different types of credit. Your credit mix actually accounts for 10% of your credit score.

The age of your credit impacts your credit score. It accounts for around 15% of your score. Eventually, closed accounts fall off your credit score, which can reduce the age of your overall credit—and subsequently, your credit score.

Does Paying Off a Loan Early Hurt Credit?

If you’re thinking about paying off an installment loan early, take some time to think about it. Could you keep it open? It could be an active account with a solid history of on-time payments. Keeping it open and managed shows creditors that you can maintain the account responsibly over a period of time.

Consider other possible consequences of paying off a loan early. Before you pay off your loan, check your loan agreement for any prepayment penalties. Prepayment penalties are fees that are owed if you pay off a loan before the term ends. They’re a way for the lender to regain some of the interest they would lose if the account was paid off early.

Paying Off a Mortgage Loan Early

Sometimes paying off your mortgage loan too early can cost you money. Here are steps you can take to lighten those expenses:

  • When paying extra toward a mortgage each month, specify that the extra funds should be applied toward your principal balance and not the interest.
  • Check with the mortgage lender about prepayment penalties. These penalties can be a percentage of the mortgage loan amount or equal to a set number of monthly interest payments you would have made.
  • To help protect your future credit score, always make sure you have money set aside for emergencies and only pay extra if you can afford to do so.

Paying Off an Auto Loan Early

If you’re looking to pay your auto loan off early, there are several ways you can do so. When paying your loan each month, it might be beneficial to add an extra $50 or so to your payment amount. That lets you pay off the loan in fewer months and pay less in interest over the loan term. If possible, specify that the extra amount is to pay principal and not interest.

Another option is to make a single, large extra payment each year. Mark the payment as an extra payment toward principle. Do not skip another auto payment because you made this one, as your lender might consider you late if you do.

Repaying and Paying Off Student Loans

There are no prepayment penalties on student loans. If you choose to pay student loans off early, there should be no negative effect on your credit score or standing. However, leaving a student loan open and paying monthly per the terms will show lenders that you’re responsible and able to successfully manage monthly payments and help you improve your credit score.

The Bottom Line: Will Paying Off a Loan Improve Credit?

Paying off a loan and eliminating debt, especially one that you’ve been steadily paying down for an extended period of time, is good for both your financial well-being and your credit score. But if you’re thinking of paying off a loan early solely for the purpose of boosting your credit score, do some homework first to ensure it will actually help. If paying a loan off early won’t help your score, consider doing so only if your goal is to save money on interest payments or because it’s what’s best for your financial situation.

The post Does Paying Off a Loan Early Hurt Your Credit Score? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

I Don’t Need a Credit Card But Want to Build Credit. What Can I Do?

Good credit is essential if you hope to borrow money one day for things like a new car or home. But good credit can also be important for smaller things like renting an apartment or even landing a new job. And one of the easiest ways to build the credit necessary for these things is by getting a credit card.

If you have no credit, or even bad credit, and you’re averse to getting a secured credit card to help improve your credit, there are other ways to go about establishing and building good credit.

Here are three other options for building credit and improving your credit scores.

Get It Now
Privacy Policy

1. Get a Credit-Builder Loan

A credit builder loan is a loan with a set amount you pay back over a set period of time (referred to as an installment loan). Most have repayment terms ranging from six months to 18 months, and because these loans are reported to one or more of the three national credit reporting agencies, on-time payments will help build up your credit.

Here’s how it works: A lender places your loan into a savings account, which you can’t touch until you’ve paid it off in full, allowing you to build credit and savings at the same time. And because loan amounts for credit builder loans can be quite small (just $500) it can be much easier to make monthly loan payments.

Credit-builder loans are best for people with no credit or bad credit. But, if you have good credit but don’t have any installment accounts on your credit report, a credit-builder loan could potentially raise your score since account mix is another major credit-scoring factor.

2. Pay Your Rent 

If you’re in the process of moving or need to do so in the near future, it’s a good idea to find a landlord who reports your rent payments to the major credit bureaus. Depending on what credit report or credit score is being used, these on-time monthly rent payments can give you a quick and easy credit reference and help you qualify for a loan (or at least another apartment down the road).

3. Become an Authorized User

Asking your spouse, partner or even your parent to add you onto one of their accounts as an authorized user could give your credit a boost. If the account they put you on has a perfect payment history and low balances, you’ll likely get “credit” when that account starts appearing on your credit reports. You won’t necessarily need to use the card to benefit from this strategy. It is a good idea to have your friend or family member check with their issuer to be sure that it reports authorized users to the three major credit reporting agencies (not all do).

Remember, one of the most important things in building good credit is making timely loan and bill payments. Bills like rent or utilities may not be universally reported to the credit bureaus, but if they go unpaid long enough, they can hurt your credit, especially if they go into collection. (You can see how any collections accounts may be affecting your credit by viewing your two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

If your credit is in rough shape, due to a collection account or other payment history troubles, you may be able to improve your scores by paying delinquent accounts, addressing high credit card balances and disputing any errors that may be weighing them down. And remember, you can build good credit in the long term by keeping debt levels low, making timely payments and adding to the mix of accounts you have as your score and wallet can handle it.

[Offer: If you need help fixing your credit, Lexington Law can help you meet your goals. Learn more about them here or call them at (844) 346-3296 for a free consultation.]

More on Credit Reports & Credit Scores:

  • The Credit.com Credit Reports Learning Center
  • How to Get Your Free Annual Credit Report
  • How Credit Impacts Your Day-to-Day Life

Image: Jacob Ammentorp Lund

The post I Don’t Need a Credit Card But Want to Build Credit. What Can I Do? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com